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Developing Breakthrough RNA Therapeutics

By interweaving nucleic acid scientists with clinicians dedicated to finding new cures, our goal is to create a new paradigm for organizing molecular research that enables the rapid application of new biological discoveries to solutions for unmet challenges in human health.

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RTI Spotlight

Anastasia Khvorova, PhD, the Remondi Family Chair in Biomedical Research and professor of RNA therapeutics, was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal for Distinguished Scholarship. As recipient of the award, Dr. Khvorova presented the plenary lecture at the UMass Chan research retreat.

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2022 RNA Therapeutics: From Concept to Clinic

Save the dates for June 22-24, 2022 for the 4th annual RNA Therapeutics Symposium. Inclusivity and family support awards are available!

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ScienceLIVE Educational Outreach Program

ScienceLIVE is an educational science outreach program for Worcester area middle schools. We provide opportunities for students to engage with our diverse postdoctoral and graduate student trainees through interactive, exciting virtual and hands-on STEM activities.

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Support Our Next Breakthrough

For decades, scientists at UMass Chan have been pioneers in RNA biology and leading innovators in the development of information-based therapeutics: cutting-edge therapeutic tools that leverage our understanding of the human genome in ways that are revolutionizing how we treat disease. With your support, we are poised to unleash their power, and change the world for the better.
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Research Spotlight

Using a short, synthetic chain of chemically modified nucleotides engineered in the RNA Therapeutics Institute, Robert H. Brown Jr., DPhil, MD, Jonathan Watts, PhD, and colleagues suppressed mutant forms of an ALS gene known as C9ORF72 in a single-patient pilot study. C9ORF72 is the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Read more at UMass Med News, MassLIVE, and article, Suppression of mutant C9orf72 expression by a potent mixed backbone antisense oligonucleotide.

 

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Journey of a Nobel Discovery

Presented by ICBA, BBC StoryWorks

Meet Craig Mello, part of the RTI at UMass Chan, who was awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, with Andrew Z. Fire, for the discovery of RNA interference. The discovery of RNAi has given scientists unprecedented opportunities to develop new life-saving therapies and advance our basic understanding of biology. 

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