Current Research Studies

A Research of Treatment for Marijuana Use and Schizophrenia

Funding Source: National Institute of Health
IRB Docket # H00001171

People who have schizophrenia often abuse marijuana. We are studying whether FDA approved medication Clozapine can reduce marijuana use. The study lasts about 14 weeks and involves weekly meetings with the research staff, answering questions about substance use and current symptoms. Half the people in the study will get a medicine called “clozapine” and the other half will get a medicine called “risperidone”. People in the study will not know which type of pill they are getting.

We are looking for people who have been told they have schizophrenia, are willing to take medicine for schizophrenia, use marijuana regularly and are ages 18-55.

People in the study will be paid at each meeting for their time. If you are interested and would like more information, please call Radhika Natarajan at 508-856-8323 or email: Radhika.Natarajan@umassmed.edu.

Risperidone and Desipramine in Alcohol Use and Schizophrenia Study (RADIAUS)

Funding source: National Institute of Health
IRB docket # 14857

Alcohol abuse and dependence is roughly three times more common among people suffering from schizophrenia than in the general population. In this study, we are looking to evaluate a specific combination of two drugs, risperidone and desipramine, in treating alcohol abuse in people with schizophrenia. Some studies have shown that risperidone, an antipsychotic drug, and desipramine, an antidepressant drug, together may reduce daily alcohol consumption among individuals who regularly drink alcohol. For the first two weeks of the study, participants will be placed on risperidone at a dosage determined by the study psychiatrist. After two weeks, participants will continue to take risperidone and will also begin to receive either desipramine or a placebo pill. The study may last for up to 16 weeks, during which participants will be seen on a weekly basis by the study team.

In order to be eligible for this study, you must be diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, drink alcohol regularly, and be between ages of 18-65.

Compensation will be provided. For more information, please contact Matthew Goodnow at 508-856-2494 or at matthew.goodnow@umassmed.edu

Salsalate as an Adjunctive Treatment in Patients with Schizophrenia

Funding source: National Institute of Health
IRB docket # 14814

Do you suffer from schizophrenia? Are you interested in participating in a study that evaluates the effectiveness of an aspirin-like drug in treating schizophrenia? We are currently looking to recruit individuals for a 12-week study in which participants will receive an anti-inflammatory drug called salsalate. Some studies have shown that anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and salsalate may improve schizophrenic symptoms. Over the course of the 12-week study, participants will be evaluated on their cognitive abilities and symptoms of schizophrenia.

To be eligible, you must be diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, currently be taking an antipsychotic medication, and be between the ages of 18 and 65.

Compensation will be provided. For more information, please contact Radhika Natarajan at 508-856-8323 or at Radhika.Natarajan@umassmed.edu