Newsmaker: Go fish!

April 11, 2011
 Zebra Fish

 A feature in the Worcester Telegram and Gazette explores how researchers at UMass Medical School are using the tiny zebrafish to answer groundbreaking questions about basic biological mechanisms controlling development and disease. Answers to these questions may one day lead to potential new treatments for a host of vascular, genetic and neurological diseases.  


Nathan Lawson, PhD, associate professor of molecular medicine, Charles G. Sagerstrom, PhD, associate professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology, Craig Ceol, PhD, assistant professor of molecular medicine, and Scot Wolfe, PhD, associate professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology and molecular medicine, discuss their respective research and how the zebrafish’s unique attributes, such as the melanocytes that give the fish’s distinctive stripes their dark color, are helping to answer these important biological questions. 

Read the full story in the Telegram & Gazette: 
Zebrafish key to cure?

Other news:

Humble zebrafish being used to study disease
Boston Globe – April 9, 2011

Humble zebrafish being used to study disease
Boston Herald – April 9, 2011

Zebrafish being used to study cancer, other diseases
Chicago Sun-Times – April 9, 2011

Humble zebrafish being used to study disease
WHDH – April 9, 2011

Humble zebrafish being used to study disease
Washington Examiner – April 9, 2011

Humble zebrafish being used to study disease
Albany Times Union – April 9, 2011

UMass Scientists Using Zebrafish's Dark Stripes To Single Out Cancer Gene
WCVB – April 9, 2011

Humble zebrafish being used to study disease
NECN – April 9, 2011

Related links:

UMMS researchers uncover novel flow-responsive genetic pathway responsible for triggering vascular growth 
Fish stripes give clues to fight melanoma 
Daily Voice: In search of . . . melanoma progression, Craig Joseph Ceol