Open book . . . Achankeng “AC” Afiadata, SOM ’15

On Wednesday, the Daily Voice introduces you to a student or resident at UMass Medical School. We’ve asked our subjects to answer a few questions that might reveal a little of their personalities. If you know someone who you’d like to see profiled, let us know at ummscommunications@umassmed.edu.


 

Achankeng “AC” Afiadata, from Milford, is a member of Kelley House. 
DV-afiadata-achankeng

Why did you choose UMass Medical School?

Being one of the top-ranked schools in the nation, and also staying close to home were the major deciding factors for me. It is also relatively cheaper than most medical schools.

Describe yourself in six words or fewer.

Cute, athletic, hardworking and humorous.

If you were stranded on a deserted island, name three things you would want.

Food, water and survival skills.

If you could have dinner with a famous person, living or dead, who would that be and why?

Greg Mortenson. I would like to talk to him about his journey and the route he took to build hundreds of schools in Pakistan and Afghanistan to educate girls.

What person or experience made you decide to pursue a medical degree and why?

My childhood experiences with bouts of illnesses and the lack of decent health care in Cameroon. It would allow me to combine my passion for science and help the underserved.

What is the most interesting or challenging job (paid or unpaid) you’ve ever had and what did you learn about yourself?

Being a certified nursing assistant at a nursing home. I learned that I am a compassionate person, and that it does not take a lot for me to get close to patients.

What would your fellow students be surprised to learn about you?

I did my middle and part of high school education at a boarding school in Cameroon.

If UMass Medical School had not been an option, what would you be doing right now?

I would have been unhappy at another medical school.

If you could change the world as a physician, what would you like to do?

I would like to reduce health disparities by opening clinics in underserved areas around the world.

Most surprising thing you’ve found out about medical school?

That it is not all about studying and getting good grades. It is all about finding the right balance putting your best foot forward in all you do.

Most surprising thing you’ve discovered about Worcester?

The number of family-owned restaurants in the area. I don’t know the exact number, but I know that there are a lot!