2014 HEADLINES

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Scientific American article highlights UMMS research that led to the discovery of ciliopathies

Scientific American article highlights UMMS research that led to the discovery of ciliopathies

A news article by Scientific American explains how research at UMMS led to the discovery that cilia dysfunction causes polycystic kidney disease, which led to the discovery of other diseases now known as ciliopathies.

Molecular Cell cover features research from Zamore lab

Molecular Cell cover features research from Zamore lab

A study from the Zamore lab featured on the cover of the Dec. 4 issue of Molecular Cell provides new insights into the biochemical mechanisms governing how piRNAs target select genetic elements for silencing.

Katherine Fitzgerald, PhD, recognized as a 2014 Milstein Award Laureate

Katherine Fitzgerald, PhD, recognized as a 2014 Milstein Award Laureate

Katherine Fitzgerald, PhD, has been recognized by the International Cytokine and Interferon Society for her work in innate immunity, specifically in interferon production.

Office of Clinical Affairs offers residents rotation in health policy

Office of Clinical Affairs offers residents rotation in health policy

The Office of Clinical Affairs, a unit within UMass Medical School’s Commonwealth Medicine division, has established a new residency program in health policy in which students collaborate on a health policy project and shadow leadership at MassHealth.

2014: Year in review

2014: Year in review

It’s been another banner year at UMass Medical School. Whether it was news about the Ebola crisis, the urgent need for increased NIH funding or recognition of the groundbreaking programs and scientists here, UMassMedNow kept the medical school community informed every day. Here are some of the biggest stories we covered in 2014. We’re looking forward to an even bigger 2015. 

UMMS family physician: Binge drinking may not equal addiction, but it will hurt your health

UMMS family physician: Binge drinking may not equal addiction, but it will hurt your health

Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol this holiday may not make you an addict—according to a recent CDC report on the diagnostic criteria for alcoholism—but it will significantly damage your body. Dennis Dimitri, MD, explains the adverse effects of binge drinking in this Expert’s Corner.

Current Biology highlights innovative GSBS career training initiative

Current Biology highlights innovative GSBS career training initiative

Cynthia Fuhrmann, PhD, talked to Current Biology about the BEST program at UMass Medical School’s Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences; the program is highlighted in a feature story about innovative career development programs.

MassAHEC Network, Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing collaborating on new program for sign language interpreters

MassAHEC Network, Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing collaborating on new program for sign language interpreters

The rising demand for American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters who have the proficiency and comfort to perform in a health care setting led to the development of a new training program offered by UMass Medical School, MassHealth, and the Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. 

Chancellor Collins releases statement on UMass President Robert Caret's departure

Chancellor Collins releases statement on UMass President Robert Caret's departure

Chancellor Michael F. Collins issued the following statement on the announced departure of University of Massachusetts President Robert Caret.

$1M grant to boost development of rapid Ebola diagnostic test; UMMS supporting effort

$1M grant to boost development of rapid Ebola diagnostic test; UMMS supporting effort

UMass Medical School is involved in a new initiative, led by Diagnostics For All, to develop a rapid diagnostic test for Ebola. Such testing will make a ‘huge difference,’ according to Ebola survivor and physician Rick Sacra, who spoke at the State House press conference about the project.

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