2015 CTSA

- Archives -

Clinical and translational science award renewed

Clinical and translational science award renewed

UMass Medical School has received a four year renewal of its Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health. The award supports efforts by UMMS and its clinical partner, UMass Memorial, to advance clinical research.

UMMS study shows Google Glass effective tool for toxicology consult in ER

UMMS study shows Google Glass effective tool for toxicology consult in ER

Toxicologist Peter R. Chai, MD, studies the use of Google Glass in the emergency room for virtual consults.

UMMS research implicates immune system in Rett syndrome

UMMS research implicates immune system in Rett syndrome

Research at UMMS suggests the immune system plays an unsuspected and surprising role in the progression of Rett syndrome, a severe neurological disorder affecting children. The finding points to the immune system as a promising target for slowing the progression of Rett syndrome.

Pilot clinical study at UMMS to test ‘Sugar’ diabetes app

Pilot clinical study at UMMS to test ‘Sugar’ diabetes app

An advanced smartphone application developed at Worcester Polytechnic Institute to help people with diabetes better manage their weight and blood sugar level and assess the status of chronic foot ulcers, is entering a pilot clinical study at UMass Medical School.

Searching the microbiome for clues to managing inflammatory bowel disease

Searching the microbiome for clues to managing inflammatory bowel disease

Based on the success of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Anti-Inflammatory Diet, Barbara Olendzki is collaborating with colleagues in the UMass Center for Microbiome Research to uncover how exactly this diet affects gut bacteria.

Solving the complex problem of recurrent C. diff with a simple solution

Solving the complex problem of recurrent C. diff with a simple solution

Fecal transplant, a novel therapy that Randy Pellish, MD, is exploring with his patients who have recurrent C. diff, is proving to be more than 90 percent effective.

If you belong to a family with long-lived relatives, does that mean you will be too?

If you belong to a family with long-lived relatives, does that mean you will be too?

A new study by UMMS researchers finds that severe mortality-associated diseases are less prevalent in families of long-lived individuals than in the general population.

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