Division of Geriatric Medicine

Research

The Division of Geriatric Medicine is involved in a variety of research areas focused on improving the quality of life and care of older adults such as:

  • Efforts relating to developing and testing interventions to reduce the risk of medication errors that lead to adverse drug events in the elderly.
  • Current approaches to patient-physician communication and interdisciplinary care coordination affect medication management of older patients with cancer to determine if it is possible to reduce unnecessary medication use in older adults with life limiting illnesses.
  • Consequences of older adults not taking prescribed medication. Off-Label use of Antipsychotics in the Nursing Home
  • Examining the role of cognitive impairment in the performance of self-care activities in patients with chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure.
  • Programs to Strengthen Physicians’ Training in Geriatrics so they are better able to provide care for the elderly in their practices.

Some projects include:

Cost-related Underuse of Medications and the Health of Older Adults 
The overall goal of this project is to improve understanding of cost-related medication non-adherence (CRN), with emphasis on how the financial instability generated by rising cost-sharing impacts the health of older adults. Specific aims are: 1) To describe the development and duration of CRN over time, and identify associated risk factors of CRN. 2) To identify the potential consequences of CRN on patient health and health care expenditures. 3) To develop a new model of CRN behavior and recommendations for cost-sharing that encourages the most clinically appropriate care.
Principle Investigator: 
Becky A. Briesacher
Date: August 5th 2011 – August 31st 2013
Funding Agency: National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Further Grant Information

iADAPT: Off-label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in the Nursing Home Setting 
The overall aim of this study is to conduct a needs assessment in the nursing home setting relevant to the AHRQ Comparative Effectiveness Research Summary Guides (CERSG) entitled “Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs.” The assessment will identify: (a) interest in and barriers to the use of the AHRQ atypical antipsychotic CERSG in the nursing home setting; (b) the key audiences and stakeholders that influence atypical antipsychotic drug use in nursing homes; and (c) approaches that could be used to integrate CER Review products into the nursing home setting.
Principle Investigator: 
Jerry Gurwitz
Date: September 30th 2010 – September 29th 2013
Funding Agency: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Further Grant Information

Medical Illness and Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults: Heart Failure as a Model
The primary objectives of this project are: 1) to prospectively examine cognitive function in patients aged 65 years and older from the time of hospitalization for HF through 3-months after hospital discharge, 2) to prospectively examine the performance of self-care activities from the time of hospitalization for HF through 3-months after hospital discharge, 3) to examine the relation between cognitive function and performance of self-care activities at selected time intervals following hospital discharge for HF, and 4) to develop and pilot test an intervention to enhance self-care practices for HF survivors that is tailored to a patient’s cognitive status.
Principle Investigator: 
Jane Saczynski, Jane Steele
Date: August 8th 2011 – August 31st 2015
Funding Agency: National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Further Grant Information

Psychosocial Factors and Rehospitalization after Acute Myocardial Infarction 
The major goals of this study are to: describe the prevalence of, and change in, chemotherapeutic index (CI) and Depression among survivors of AMI at 1 and 6 weeks after hospital-discharge; examine the extent to which AMI self-management behaviors at 6 weeks post-discharge vary according to CI and Depression at 1-week post discharge and the change in these factors from 1 to 6 weeks post hospital-discharge; and to examine whether rates of 30-day and 1-year rehospitalization and mortality vary according to CI and depression at 1 and 6 weeks post hospital-discharge.
Principle Investigator: 
Jane Saczynski, Jane Steele
Date: August 5 2011 – April 30th 2013 
Funding Agency: National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute (NIH)
Further Grant Information


 Interested in participating in or supporting our research?   

Please call us at (508) 856-3085.